Faculty

Aliza Luft


Assistant Professor


Contact Information

Email    aluft@soc.ucla.edu
Office  291 Haines Hall
Phone  310-206-2724
My research focuses on ethnic, racial, and religious boundary processes, gender, high-risk mobilization, and the causes and consequences of violence.

These interests are reflected in my published papers and ongoing research. In these projects, I examine three aspects of decision-making in violent contexts. First, I study wartime defection, or how people shift stances from support for state violence to resistance and saving behaviors within the same violent episode. Second, I investigate the relationship between social boundaries and political behaviors, with a specific interest in how racial, ethnic, and religious cleavages inform and are transformed by extreme violence such as genocide. Third, I analyze the role of gender in politically violent movements. Here, I focus on how gender informs individual’s decisions to support and participate in war, and how gender is implicated in movement's decisions to adopt violent tactics.

Degrees

Ph.D., Sociology, University of Wisconsin - Madison (Ph.D. Minor in Political Science).

M.S., Sociology, University of Wisconsin - Madison.

M.A., Education, University of California-Berkeley.

B.A., Sociology, History, Religion, Bates College, Lewiston, ME.

Selected Publications

Luft, Aliza (2015). “Toward a Dynamic Theory of Action at the Micro-Level of Genocide: Killing, Desistance, and Saving in 1994 Rwanda.” Sociological Theory. 33(2):148-172.

Luft, Aliza (2015). “Genocide as Contentious Politics.” Sociology Compass. 9(10): 897-909.

Luft, Aliza (2016). “Women's and Feminist Activism in Eastern Africa.” The Wiley Blackwell Encyclopedia of Gender and Sexuality Studies, eds: Nancy Naples, Renee C. Hoogland, Maithree Wickramasinghe, & Angela Wong. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing.

Luft, Aliza (2016). “LGBT Activism in Easterm Africa.” The Wiley Blackwell Encyclopedia of Gender and Sexuality Studies, eds: Nancy Naples, Renee C. Hoogland, Maithree Wickramasinghe, & Angela Wong. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing.

Luft, Aliza (2016). “Who Counts? The Mathematics of Life and Death after Genocide,” by Diane M. Nelson. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2015. In Contemporary Sociology.

Luft, Aliza (2017). “Has the 2016 Election Institutionalized Systemic Social Exclusion and Violence in America—and Perhaps Paved the Way for Authoritarianism and the Possible ‘Social Death’ of Groups Perceived as Undesirable to the New Administration in Washington?” Jewish Social Studies: History, Culture, Society. 22(3): 2013-211.